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Library

The Canadian Healthcare Education Common's Virtual Library provides educators and learners with easy access to educational materials, including virtual patients or electronic cases.

 

Total Learning Objects currently in library: 1492


14 Jul 15

Scientists decry Canada’s outdated Wi-Fi safety rules

Description: 

This article explores the contention between the Canadian Federal Government and scientists regarding the saftey requirements and regulations of wi-fi. 

Kate Proctor
14 Jul 15

Time to rethink EMRs

Description: 

For full access to the article, please subscribe to the Canadian Medical Associaion Journal. 

Kate Proctor
14 Jul 15

Advancing social media in medical education

Description: 

This article looks into the impact and advancement of social media in medical education. 

For full access to the article, please subscribe to the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Kate Proctor
14 Jul 15

The Development and Preliminary Validation of a Rubric to Assess Medical Students' Written Summary Statements in Virtual Patient Cases

Description: 

"Purpose: The ability to create a concise summary statement can be assessed as a marker for clinical reasoning. The authors describe the development and preliminary validation of a rubric to assess such summary statements."

Kate Proctor
14 Jul 15

Improving Documentation Timeliness: A "Brighter Future" for the Electronic Medical Record in Resident Clinics

Description: 

"This project was completed at Children's Hospital Primary Care Clinic at Vanderbilt, which is staffed by 74 residents, supervised by 17 attendings. A longitudinal observational study using convenience sampling for the last full week of each month from October 2010-January 2012 was planned. Baseline documentation completion rates were assessed, then age-specific, structured data-entry forms were introduced beginning in March 2011. Run charts were created for completion data for all clinic visits in the sample. Physician self-report of satisfaction with and stress related to documentation was assessed through pre- and postintervention surveys."

Kate Proctor
14 Jul 15

Finding the Middle Path in Tracking Former Patients in the Electronic Health Record for the Purpose of Learning

Description: 

"[T]he authors highlight the potential for ethical conflict whenever clinical care and teaching mingle, and discuss how these competing interests can still be balanced in the face of advancing technology by applying universal ethical principles and following the advice of Hippocrates."

Kate Proctor
14 Jul 15

Putting Communities in the Driver's Seat: The Realities of Community-Engaged Medical Education.

Description: 

"The authors describe the ways in which CEME, which features active community participation, can improve medical education while meeting community needs and advancing national and international health equity agendas. They suggest that CEME can redefine student learning as taking place at the center of the partnership between communities and medical schools. They also consider the challenges of CEME and caution that criteria for community engagement must be sensitive to cultural variations and to the nature of the social contract in different sociocultural settings.

The authors argue that CEME is effective in producing physicians who choose to practice in rural and underserved areas. Further research is required to demonstrate that CEME contributes to improved health, and ultimately health equity, for the populations served by the medical school."

Kate Proctor
14 Jul 15

Health Systems Innovation at Academic Health Centers: Leading in a New Era of Health Care Delivery

Description: 

"[T]he authors review publicly available promotions materials at top-ranked medical schools and find that while criteria for advancement increasingly recognize systems innovation, there is a lack of specificity on metrics beyond the traditional yardstick of peer-reviewed publications. In addition to new promotions pathways and alternative evidence for the impact of scholarship, other approaches to fostering health systems innovation at AHCs include more robust funding for career development in health systems innovation, new curricula to enable trainees to develop skills in health systems innovation, and new ways for innovators to disseminate their work. AHCs that foster health systems innovation could meet a critical need to contribute both to the sustainability of our health care system and to AHCs’ continued leadership role within it."

Full access to the article requires a subscription to the Association of Merican Medical Colleges Journal

Kate Proctor
14 Jul 15

Where Population Health Misses the Mark: Breaking the 80/20 Rule

Description: 

"Conventional population management theory, predicated on prevention and keeping the healthy majority healthy, fails to address the root cause of the unsustainable health care spending trajectory in the United States. The national health care agenda has been heavily influenced by the assumptions that disease prevention and the general promotion of “population health” will be sufficient to reduce health care spending to a sustainable level. However, a very small subset of the population with chronic and complex conditions account for a disproportionate share of health care spending, and unnecessary variation in the care of those chronic and complex episodes wastes 20% to 30% of the episodic spending. Health care spending follows what is known as “the 80/20 rule,” with 80% of all spending being incurred by only 20% of the population. Whether a population is defined as a company, a county, or a country, the overwhelming majority of their health care spending comes from a small minority of the individuals, and the bulk of that spending is associated with either largely unavoidable and unpredictable single events or complex episodes of care. Achieving an economically sustainable health care system will require more efficient and effective delivery of those complex episodes of care."

Kate Proctor